Wednesday, July 28, 2010

From the Guardian

Thank goodness some people are talking sense.

Alan Thomas and Harriet Pattison:

"Evidence including our own suggests strongly that this kind of education (home education) prepares children to enter further and higher education, or the workforce – and offers them the freedom to learn in the ways that suit them best. Yet there is a consistent failure on the part of local authorities and government reviews to grasp even the basis of the ideas that can underlie a different kind of education. Even the language of the serious case review demonstrates this failure of understanding. Small wonder that home-educating parents are afraid of conferring power on people who do not know what it is that they are judging."

7 comments:

Dave H said...

Regular bunfight with the ignorant in progress in the comment thread.

Jacinta said...

The quote you selected just about sums it all up.

"They" really are just trying to grind down all Home Educators until they just give up. It's like the hydra - you chop off one head (Ed Balls?) and another appears.

"They" could be in for a long wait. Maybe when it's minus 30 in Hell "they" might be successful.

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